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Realtor.com Home Organization Round Up

Realtor.com Home Organization Round Up

Getting organized in your home means different things for different people. And just as the urge to get organized strikes everyone at different times for a myriad of reasons, it’s useful to approach each room in your home in a way that makes sense for each space.

Over the past year, we partnered with Realtor.com to break down the best approaches to get some of the most trafficked areas of your home in order.

Kitchen

Ever notice that at a party, whether the kitchen is open concept or a galley style, your guests always congregate in this space? Even outside of a gathering, the kitchen proves to be a hub of activity in many homes.  Aim to keep it functional and fuss free to get the most impact out of this important area.  One way to do so is to keep your counters clear of any non-essential, non daily use items.  And while you’re at it, try infusing the space with a pop of color, such as a pretty bowl of bright green apples or lemons.

Bathroom

It’s very common for bathrooms to get overcrowded with excess toiletries and medicines that simply aren’t needed or used everyday. Try to keep the bare necessities within your medicine cabinet and sparsely out on counter tops. You can then store your back up items in a linen closet or area you don’t interact with everyday.

While sorting through these items keep in mind that the smaller the product, the harder it can be to locate. We’re talking about those hotel-size shampoos, lotion samples you’ve ripped from magazines, and the tiny makeup tubes that come with larger purchases at department stores. Donate these unused items to groups that’ll gladly take unopened toiletries, including homeless shelters, church committees, and school drives for the needy.

Once you have identified your bathroom essentials, the next step is to find a home for everything. Take advantage of any place you can carve out some real estate. Consider the back of the bathroom door, the inside of a closet door, or a mounted bin or rack on the wall. These spots are often overlooked storage opportunities.

Also, no one wants to gaze down at a plunger. Ditto for that jug of Clorox, box of feminine products, or dog-eared pile of golf magazines. Try to stash unattractive or just plain pedestrian items under the sink so they’re not the first items you and your guests see everyday.

Basement

It’s easy for a basement to become a catch all space for piles of junk, towers of boxes, and a mishmash of other things you have been unable to make decisions about.

Challenge yourself to keep this space minimally filled to avoid it becoming a dumping ground. Also be sure to maximize the bare, tall walls a basement often offers by putting in shelving to create more storage options.

Take a quarterly inventory of the items you keep in your basement to ensure it remains as scant as possible.

Kids' Rooms

When it comes to keeping kids’ rooms organized, a great technique is to approach it like a child would.  Pick a section to work on, and then literally sit on the carpet with your child and go through each type of toy.  Ask your child about the toys so you can determine how often she plays with them or whether she’s outgrown a few.  By posing these questions, you’ll begin to develop categories according to them. As you start to put the toys back, show your tot that the coloring books and pencils go together, all the cars have a home, and the same thing for her dolls.  And don’t forget to label each container or attach a photo of the toys that should go inside.

Once the toys are organized, inspire your kids to help keep them this way.  Teaching children from a young age to own their items puts the onus on them to routinely assess their belongings and maintain their own spaces.  By practicing the task of putting things away where they belong, you’ll enable your kids to be independent, make their own decisions, and have great organizational skills for life.

By approaching organization in an intentional way, these changes to your home will give you an entirely new appreciation of your space.

Photo Credits: Anthony Delanoix, Dominik Martin, William LeMond, Unsplash, StockSnap

Katie McCann

Katie McCann is a native New Yorker who currently resides in the Bronx and is a graduate of Towson University in Maryland. Katie’s relaxed and non-judgmental demeanor and attitude puts her clients at ease when she is organizing their spaces. She believes a home should be a place of calm and order and can help to create that.

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